FTMTF

Tumblr is a cool place. Writers, artists, activists. Lots of people find solace there. I tried to, when I first made an account in 2013, then in middle school. Actually, it wasn’t so cool back then. Hoards of young girls like me, with their newfound platform, curated ‘Black-and-white’ blogs (just check out some of the usernames), impressive collections of grey-scaled gifs, a smorgasbord of para-suicidal images: self-harm, handfuls of pills…

Thankfully, vices on Tumblr quickly find themselves replaced by new fads; gone were the days of glamorized self-mutilation– hello, fandom! (My own guilty pleasure was House MD, if anyone’s curious. Dark, dark days.) But like black-and-white blogs before them, these profiles were also quickly replaced. This time? by SJW blogs.
Now, granted, not everything about new justice craze sucked. For one, it’s where most of my peers and I received feminism 101, even if it got some things quite wrong (eg. feminism is for men, too; makeup is empowering; kinky is progressive, etc), and the general atmosphere of tolerance allowed for young gay teens like me the freedom of expression that wasn’t as safe on twitter or facebook at the time. Still, a lot of crazy shit came out of SJW tumblr.
When things like otherkin, fictionkin, and aesthetigender (for full effect, I’m going to have to ask you to go through the pain of scrolling through the whole list on that last one), are accepted as anywhere even near the realm of reality, it’s no wonder that ‘Woman’ has become distorted, conflated, and commandeered.
My own personal attraction to the booming trans trend is obvious in retrospect. Teen girls are taught to hate everything about themselves. None of us can win. Even the thinnest, most clear-skinned, prettiest of girls find an enemy in the mirror. Imagine my horror to look at my reflection and see a fat, short-haired, lesbian staring back. In a world where my style, my interests, and my attractions weren’t fit for a girl, transgenderism offered the perfect solution: Be a boy.
It wouldn’t work, of course. How could it, when all of my problems had nothing to do with how I identified and everything to do with what I was: female. Of course, as a 14-year-old, this wasn’t quick to occur to me. My transition to ‘boy’ was my ticket out of Self-hatred-Ville, and you’d better believe I was going to take it. To exactly nobody’s surprise, Tumblr was ecstatic with my ‘realization’. A plethora of congratulations, encouragement, and support was sent my way– something that girl-me never got for being exactly the same as boy-me, save having a different name and pronouns. So of course it felt right.
Something that I feel like a lot of adults get wrong about this phenomenon is that people like me were bullied into identifying as trans, but I don’t think this is the most accurate way to put it. There’s a very specific kind of mental mind-fuck that went on on Tumblr during this time that cultivated the perfect atmosphere for confused, self-hating teens (which is like, all of them) to somehow come to the realization that they’re transgender. First came a kind of twisted rewriting of history, women like Joan of Arc or Christina, Queen of Sweden (who once wrote she was “neither Male nor Hermaphrodite, as some People in the World have pass’d me for.” Interesting… maybe society has always been telling GNC women that they aren’t true women…) now became ‘trans men who didn’t know at the time, because it wasn’t accepted’. By telling GNC women, who weren’t around to ‘defend’ their womanhood, that they were men, is it any wonder those of us who were around started to think we must be men, too? Another thing was the constant validationoftranspeople. In order for me to become instantly ‘valid,’ all I had to do was be a man. How could I do that? By feeling like one. What did that feel like? Don’t know, but since I didn’t feel like a woman (which I know realize is because I can’t; woman isn’t a feeling), the leap was easy for me to make: I must be a man.
It at the time all seemed very progressive– by ignoring history and biology, we could rewrite reality, and anyone could be anything they wanted (might I remind you of this list once more). What was really going on though was the complete opposite. First of all, words didn’t have meaning anymore. According to new gender logic, even male and female were fluid. A trans woman was now female by virtue of identifying as ‘woman’, all attempts at any kind of discussion about gender and sex are rendered impossible, because 1. Any disagreement labeled you a transphobe and a TERF, and you were quite literally ostracized, and 2. gender didn’t mean anything anymore (save some mysterious, cryptic feeling that refuses to be defined, apparently).
By the time my mother figured out what was going on with me, I was in deep. Female-to-Male transition videos filled my Youtube suggestions, and I had already decided I would want a metoidioplasty over a phalloplasty (a decision that I now recognize as a desire for my maleness to be real, not a section of skin from my arm or leg, an impossible desire that could never be fulfilled, I know now, because I’m not male). I decided to take my first physical ‘transition’ step by getting a binder. Just one problem– being fourteen meant I had no job, and no money. So, I improvised. As a blogger with several thousand followers (nope, I’m not going to link myself, as I would be chased off and/or doxxed in approximately .00023 seconds), I put out a quick plea for help in buying a binder. Within a few hours, a well-meaning follower asked my size and told me it would arrive in a few short days. Unfortunately, or so I thought at the time, I was unable to intercept the package before my mom did.
Accidentally being outed sucks. I remember getting a text from my mom while in school which said something along the lines of ‘We have something important to talk about when you get home,’ which, to nearly any teen, could mean a multitude of terrible things, and exactly zero good things. Throughout this whole story, my mom approached things really well, but in retrospect only, I hated her guts at the time. She picked me up from school and let me marinate in the soul-crushing silence until we were about half-way home. She got straight to the point and told me that she had opened my package and found my binder. I immediately went into panic mode, so I don’t exactly remember how she coaxed a confession of transgender out of me, but involved a lot of blubbering. She let me know from the get-go that she thought my ‘felt like boy’ spiel was all a load of crap, though to be fair, put it much less insensitively, but asked me to show her videos and literature about it. I did. She wasn’t impressed.
I remember being afraid that this meant she was now going to make me grow out my short hair, or–god forbid– start wearing dresses, in an attempt to stifle my ‘transness’, but that wasn’t the case. It was hurtful to me that she wouldn’t use my new name or pronouns, but I was allowed to continue to be as GNC as I saw fit, something that I know helped my self-acceptance as a woman today. She made it clear that medical transition was not going to happen, which felt like the end of the world to me. In the same way you wouldn’t tell a schizophrenic that they’re delusions are real, she took no interest in pretending that male was something that I was, or ever could be. But most importantly, she let me know that that was okay. That I could be masculine, that I could like women, and that I could exist as myself, in my body. That pumping myself full of hormones and cutting off my flesh would change my appearance, but not me. If I was ever going to be happy, it had nothing to do with my pronouns, or my genitals, I had to accept the female, and the woman, that I was.
Of course it took a lot of therapy to actually get that through my thick skull, and until then, the road was pretty bumpy. One of the biggest problems I think with being transgender is it comes out of an unhappiness, and that the impossibility of the accepted solution amplifies the unhappiness. Having short hair doesn’t give you an adam’s apple, testosterone injections won’t change your bone structure, a phalloplasty won’t let you produce sperm. The closer you get to the real thing, the further the gap between you and being a real male grows. Freeing yourself from the task of climbing a mountain whose peak can never be summited is your only chance of ever actually being happy. I eventually stopped looking for validation as something I would never be, and started the process of loving myself. There’s no real how-to I can give for overcoming gender dysphoria and accepting your given gender, but there are some tips I can spare. Firstly, be patient. Whether it’s you or someone you love who is trans, one conversation, experience, or epiphany is not going to change anyone’s mind. Secondly, and this is geared towards trans identified females: Get into gender critical theory. Liberal feminism tells us that women are oppressed because of their gender, but that isn’t true. We’re oppressed because of our sex, by means of gender. It was hard for me to give up the imaginary solution to my oppression before I understood this. Thirdly, think long and hard about why you feel trans. What is the feeling? What would it feel like to be ‘cis’? If your answer is ‘comfortable with your sex/body’ then hardly a single woman falls under that category. Is it to feel comfortable with the expectations, limitations, and stereotypes of your gender? Once again, nary a single female applies. The hardest and final push for me to ‘detransing’ was realizing and accepting that whatever I was ‘feeling’, it wasn’t ‘boy’. It was dissatisfaction with the constraints of womanhood. Understanding that is the most important step of becoming happy with your femaleness.
For a long time, I’ve been hesitant to talk about my experience with trans. I was embarrassed, for one, into being duped by an agenda that wanted to convince me I was something I’m not, nor would ever be. I was afraid, too, of backlash. The climate among my peers these days is such that disagreement of nearly any variance means public ridicule, and being shunned. I thought people might try to tell me that I wasn’t really,  truly trans (though no one has seem to come up with what that means), or that I was just unable to come to accept my transness. I’ve decided I have to cast these doubts aside, though, because there’s something more important at stake: young women learning to love themselves. If I can convince even just one girl to love her body for what it is, and to know that no amount of butchness makes her less of a woman, then any shit cast my way is worth it.
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9 thoughts on “FTMTF

  1. Thank you, thank you, thank you. When this insane period of societal delusion ends, there will be thousands (millions?) of mutilated and hormonally destroyed people. I hope this reaches those who need it most.

    Liked by 5 people

  2. Thank you, this is a really helpful piece of writing. I’m a (gender-critical) therapist currently working with several teenage girls who believe they are trans, along with their very worried parents. Patience is so important, if parents can be helped to hang on to it while their kid has a chance to work things out.

    Liked by 5 people

  3. Thank you – an insightful statement beautifully presented.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. Thank you for sharing your journey. My 18 year old has been struggling with gender dysphoria for years now. Her dad and I sound exactly like your mom, she knows we will support and pay for any help she needs besides medical transitioning. We haven’t changed pronouns either, nor is she demanding we do when we use she/her. Our talks sound a lot like your mom’s. I’m hopeful she will come through this with body, mind and soul in tact. She is legally an adult and can do what she’d like. Which terrifies me. Your post gave me some hope.

    Liked by 4 people

  5. Incredible. So well written, and so incredibly smart and thoughtful for someone so young. I, personally, am proud of you for just being comfortable with yourself and working your way through being a teenager in this weird time. Keep speaking up. The world needs more people like you in it, willing to tell their story, and be the truest version of themselves.

    Liked by 3 people

  6. Thank you for this. It gives me some hope that my daughter will wise up too and learn to love herself. Our family is heartbroken.

    Liked by 4 people

  7. Very insightful, thank you and good luck!

    Liked by 3 people

  8. I appreciate reading this story and hearing a different viewpoint. It’s so difficult today to have an actual conversation about transgenderism other than 100% affirmative of every single child being fully medically transitioned as soon as possible if they utter any discomfort with sexed body or gender.

    Liked by 2 people

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